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Friday, January 29, 2016


The conservative movement is starting to look a lot like Syria.

Baited, taunted, mocked by Fox News, Donald Trump told Roger Ailes what he could do with his Iowa debate, and marched off to host a Thursday night rally for veterans at the same time in Des Moines.

Message: I speak for the silent majority, Roger, not you, not Megyn Kelly, not Fox News. Diss me, and I will do fine without Fox.

And so the civil-sectarian war on the right widens and deepens.

And two questions arise: Will the conservative movement and Republican Party unite behind Trump if he is the nominee? And will the movement and party come together if Trump is not the nominee?

A breakdown of the balance of forces in this civil-sectarian war finds most of the media elite of the right recoiling from Trump, while Trump leads by a huge margin in Middle America.

National Review, Commentary, the Weekly Standard, Wall Street Journal and the conservative and neocon columnists on the op-ed pages at the Washington Post and the New York Times have almost all come out viscerally against Trump.

He, in turn, has trashed several by name. Wounds have been inflicted that will not soon be forgiven or forgotten.

But while columns and magazines appear in print twice weekly, weekly, biweekly and monthly, millions listen to talk radio every hour of every day. And though websites might be updated daily, radio, more than print, is a medium that moves people.


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